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Flying Orbit Helicopter orb controlled by Brainwaves

A team called Puzzlebox are releasing a stunning looking gadget which they hope will teach children about neuroscience, open source coding and focus. Their helicopter toy is controlled by brainwaves.

Puzzlebox have been creating code to turn EEG signals into instructions that a robot can understand. In the last 24 months they have stunned audiences with headset controlled robots and video games.

[yframe url=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCvCQaJb09g’]

They also share their code and concept ideas, which is unusual. This time however it is different.

They plan on selling their Orbit Helicopter and the Kickstarter campaign has already gained enough money to fund the project. They wanted $10,000 and with 16 days to go have almost $30,000 committed to the fund.

The Orbit has a shell to protect it from damage, as you can be sure it will connect with walls, objects, pets (!) and people. The Orbit helicopter connects via Bluetooth to a Mindwave Mobile EEG headset made by Neurosky. The system links moods with ‘mood’ patterns picked up by the EEG headset.

The Orbit copter can be controlled by the headset, a smartphone and Puzzlebox mobile software. The company are also planning the Puzzlebox ‘Pyramid’, a remote control system that will collect data read by the headset. The Pyramid will reflect the mood of the person wearing the headset by a ring of coloured lights on its front panel. The company plan on sharing the design and software which makes the ORBIT fly. They say “Any interested high school or college student should be able to access and extend our software and designs.”

Kitguru says: Amazing!

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