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AMD Precision Boost Overdrive 2 coming soon to Ryzen 5000 processors

AMD is getting ready to launch a new version of Precision Boost Overdrive. Also known as PBO. This tool is often used to overclock Ryzen processors, but with Precision Boost Overdrive 2, undervolting will also be possible.

Precision Boost Overdrive 2 behaviour will be based on three aspects: CPU temperature, socket power, and motherboard VRM current. Based on the data collected while monitoring these points, PBO can raise the power consumption limiters to match the VRM capabilities, increasing both the average frequency and boost duration.

With PBO 2, AMD claims that it’s possible to increase single-thread performance without affecting the multi-threaded capacities. Additionally, users will now be able to automatically undervolt their CPUs and optimise the voltage curve to their needs and workloads with Curve Optimizer. When voltage and frequency are low, the undervolting potential increases. At a higher voltage and frequency, the undervolting potential decreases.

Image credit: Anandtech

When using PBO 2, AMD expects to see single-thread improvements of up to 2.5% in single-thread workloads on Ryzen 7 5800X, and almost 2% on Ryzen 9 5900X. In multi-thread workloads, the improvements should be more noticeable, with up to 2.1% in Ryzen 7 5800X and up to 10% in Ryzen 9 5900X.

System requirements for PBO 2 include a Ryzen 5000 series desktop CPU and an AMD 500 or 400 series motherboards with a BIOS update that includes AGESA 1.1.8.0. BIOS availability is expected in early December, but as per Anandtech, some BIOS with AGESA 1.1.0.0 already feature Curve Optimizer.

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KitGuru says: Do you own a Ryzen 5000 series desktop processor? Is it mounted on a motherboard with Curve Optimizer? If you already tried this new feature, how much extra performance were you able to squeeze from your CPU?

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