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ARM buys Sensinode to expand Internet of Things

ARM Holdings, the company behind the world’s most commonly used processors, has announced that it has purchased Sensinode Oy, a company that has primarily focused on developing software technology for the Internet of Things (IoT).

ARM has said it’s keen to assuage any concerns over continued operation, suggesting that Sensinode will continue its operation as usual and will continue to provide commercial products to existing and new customers.

“The ARM Cortex® family of processors and collaborative mbed project, together with Sensinode’s NanoStack and NanoService offering, provide the ideal foundation for thousands of new applications including wireless sensors, smart connected appliances, home health applications, and wearable electronics,” said an ARM spokesperson in a statement.

arm

Josh Cornish, current executive VP and GM of the System Design Division at ARM, was also very complimentary about the buyout: “Sensinode is a pioneer in software for low cost low power internet connected devices and has been a key contributor to open standards for IoT. By making Sensinode expertise and technology accessible to the ARM Partnership and through the ARM mbed project we will enable rapid deployment of thousands of new and innovative IoT applications.”

The Internet of Things was first proposed in 1999 by technology pioneer Kevin Ashton, who suggested that as more devices become connected around the world, it would bring about the need for them to be interconnected separately – creating their own Internet of Things.

KitGuru Says: ARM is one of those companies that goes under the radar a lot of the time, but it’s hardware is found in 95 per cent of smartphones. Chances are you all own something built by ARM.

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