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New PS5 Digital Edition revealed with subtle design changes

Over the course of a console’s life cycle, manufacturers may offer enhanced versions, such as with the PS4 Pro and cheaper versions (such as with the Switch Lite). There also exists a third type of revision, which serves as a simple SKU change with very subtle refinements. Such is the case with the PS5 Digital Edition, which is now 300g lighter and offers some slight changes.

The CFI-1100B is a new version of the PlayStation 5 Digital Edition, listed on Japanese websites alongside the updated console user manual. Thanks to this, we are able to see exactly what has changed between the launch version of this machine and this newest update.

Perhaps the most significant change is the fact that this new machine weighs 300g less than the launch edition (3.6KG vs 3.9KG). It is currently unknown what has changed internally to see such a massive change in weight, though teardowns following its release will certainly reveal all.

The other major change is the way in which the console’s stand is set up. Previously, PS5 owners would have to use a coin in order to screw the stand to the console. While easy enough, not being able to do it without a coin (or a coin-equivalent) seemed like an odd decision.

Now, the coin screw has been replaced with a thumb screw, allowing new owners to simply screw the stand into place using their fingers – thanks to a slight change in the thickness of the head and added ridges to the side.

Currently, this is all we know regarding this new model, though perhaps there may be more user-facing changes to be discovered once it releases.

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KitGuru says: What do you think of these changes? What do you think is causing such a drastic change in the system’s weight? Were you bothered by the previous screw design? Let us know down below.

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