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EFF showcases Stop Watching Us protest against NSA

The Electronic Frontier Foundation has posted up a video urging the people of America and specifically Washington DC, to join the Stop Watching Us protest this Saturday (26th October) against the NSA and US government’s surveillance schemes like PRISM, secret laws and the mass collection of personal and private data of internet users.

The video draws on activists, celebrities and whistleblowers alike, speaking out against NSA data gathering practices and the secretive trials that have made it impossible for companies like Google, Facebook, Yahoo and others, to tell the public what data they are being forced to collect on behalf of the government.

[yframe url=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGmiw_rrNxk’]

The video also draws an interesting comparison with Richard Nixon, who was famously drummed out of office for lying about illegal wiretaps. While the NSA and other organisations may have more of a legal precedent here thanks to FISA and the Patriot Act, their activities still aren’t going down well and they’ve been caught lying about it several times. In the video, we see current director of the NSA, General Clapper, clearly state that his organisation does not collect data on Americans. He’s later said that PRISM had helped foil over 40 terrorist plots. It was then revealed that that number had been inflated, and was more like one or two.

To help put an end to these secrets, lies and data harvesting, the video urges everyone who can, to go to Union Station in Washington DC this Saturday at 12PM. There will be rallies and protest marches, as well as speeches from key activists, members of the EFF and technology security experts.

KitGuru Says: Now we need something like this over here. Are any of our US reader base thinking of going to this and making your voice heard? 

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