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Corsair HX750 PSU Review

Rating: 8.5.

The Corsair HX750 supply is a performance unit, featuring ultra silent operation under all conditions. It belongs to Corsair’s high-end PSU category and although it lacks the digital interface of the HXi series, it has similar performance (if not better) and it costs less – so it is ideal for users wanting a reliable power supply who don’t care about controlling or monitoring it through software.

Corsair’s HX line consists of four supplies with capacities ranging from 750W to 1200W. In today’s review we will take a look at the smallest member of the family, the HX750.

This unit features a fully modular cable design and it is also 80 PLUS Platinum certified. In the Cybenetics scale it is ETA-A and LAMBDA-A certified, for efficiency and noise respectively.

Its external design might look boring nowadays, but don’t let that fool you. The HX750 offers exceptional performance in all areas and it is among the top picks in the 750W category, giving a hard time even to the supposedly higher-end HX750i that features a digital interface.

The truth is that the majority of users don’t care about PSU monitoring and control, so naturally they don’t want to pay extra money for those features. This is why models like the RMx and HX are more popular than their digital counterparts, RMi and HXi.

Besides the increased price tags, we believe that the added steps required to install a PSU featuring a digital interface and the complexity of the provided software (although Corsair’s Link software in its latest version is pretty easy to use), are two of the reasons behind the low popularity of power supplies featuring a digital interface.

You should take this under consideration though: in fully digital units the digital interface is just an added bonus since the hardware to offer it is already there. This is not the case though with analogue platforms, which just use some digital parts to offer monitoring and a restricted set of control features.

In other words, in fully digital PSUs there is no extra cost for the digital interface, something that doesn’t apply of course to modified analogue platforms.

Read our How We Test Power Supplies HERE

Specifications

Manufacturer (OEM) Channel Well Technology
Max. DC Output 750W
Efficiency 80 PLUS Platinum, ETA-A (88-91%)
Noise LAMBDA-A (20-25 dB[A])
Modular (Fully)
Intel C6/C7 Power State Support
Operating Temperature (Continuous Full Load) 0 – 50°C
Over Voltage Protection
Under Voltage Protection
Over Power Protection
Over Current (+12V) Protection
Over Temperature Protection
Short Circuit Protection
Surge Protection
Inrush Current Protection
Fan Failure Protection
No Load Operation
Cooling 135mm Fluid Dynamic Bearing Fan (NR135P)
Semi-Passive Operation
Dimensions (W x H x D) 150 x 87 x 180mm
Weight 1.95kg (4.3 lb)
Form Factor ATX12V v2.4, EPS 2.92
Warranty 10 Years

The original manufacturer (OEM) of the entire HX (and HXi) line is Channel Well Technology or CWT as it is widely known. This is a very good OEM with strong ties to Corsair. The HX750 is highly efficient and silent as well and this is shown by the 80 PLUS Platinum, ETA-A and LAMBDA-A badges that it caries. Moreover, the maximum temperature rating for continuous full load delivery is 50°C, as the ATX spec dictates.

All important protection features are provided, including over temperature protection (OTP) which is essential to any power supply. If the fan breaks or the operating temperature gets too high, OTP will save the day.

The cooling duties are handled by a 135mm FDB fan which is used in the majority of Corsair’s high-end units. Finally, the dimensions of the HX750 are on the large side because of the 18cm length. Someone can find now 750W and 850W models with less than 15cm depth.

Power Specifications

Rail 3.3V 5V 12V 5VSB -12V
Max. Power Amps 25 25 62.5 3 0.8
Watts 150 750 15 9.6
Total Max. Power (W) 750

The minor rails are too strong for today’s needs, while the +12V rail can deliver up to 62.5 Amperes if needed. Finally, the 5VSB has 15W capacity, which is sufficient.

Cables & Connectors

Modular Cables
Description Cable Count Connector Count (Total) Gauge In Cable Capacitors
ATX connector 20+4 pin (600mm) 1 1 16-20AWG
4+4 pin EPS12V (650mm) 2 2 18AWG
6+2 pin PCIe (680mm+100mm) 2 4 16-18AWG
SATA (500mm+115mm+115mm+115mm) 2 8 18AWG
SATA (500mm+110mm+110mm+110mm) 2 8 18AWG
4-pin Molex (550mm+100mm+100mm+100mm) 1 4 18AWG
FDD Adapter (+100mm) 1 1 20AWG
AC Power Cord (1420mm) – C13 coupler 1 1 16AWG

The HX750 uses Corsair’s Type-4 cables which utilize extra filtering capacitors to help in achieving great ripple suppression. The problem with those added caps is that they make the cables bulkier so it is more difficult to work with them, during the cable management process.

We are satisfied by the two EPS and the four PCIe connectors, however some users might expected six PCIe, since this is a high-end 750W unit. The number of SATA connectors is impressive though, while the four 4-pin Molex will be enough for most usage scenarios.

The cable length is satisfactory but the distance between the peripheral connectors is too short, at 10cm only. Normally it should be 15cm at least.

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