Home / Component / CPU / AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X (16C32T) & 1920X (12C24T) CPU Review

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X (16C32T) & 1920X (12C24T) CPU Review

The market for people buying an expensive CPU and using it for gaming at 1080p is likely to be very slim. What 1080p does is give a good indication of the CPU’s raw gaming performance as GPU power is sufficient to push frame rates to a level where the CPU and memory limitations can be observed.

We supplement the 1080p gaming results with a pair of games tested at 4K. We chose Ghost Recon Wildlands and GTA V as they are computationally-heavy, open-world games with good built-in benchmarks.

Ghost Recon Wildlands

We run the built-in benchmark using a 4K resolution and the same settings as the 1080p test (Very High preset).

Grand Theft Auto V

We run the built-in benchmark using a 4K resolution and the same settings as the 1080p test (generally Maximum quality settings including Advanced Graphics).

4K Gaming Performance Overview:

Intel’s Kaby Lake quad-cores, such as the i7-7700K, tend to be fractionally faster in Ghost Recon Wildlands but the realistic difference is negligible and more commonly due to numerical rounding.

GTA V still shows preference for Intel hardware even at 4K but the performance difference is minor at around 5 FPS on average (around 7%). Minimum FPS performance remains strong for Threadripper, despite the variance induced by GTA V’s benchmark. However, overclocking the 12- and 16-core chips repeatedly reduced the minimum FPS figures slightly. This may be due to the reduced all-core frequency compared to the stock-clocked XFR boost capabilities.

For 4K60 gamers, all of the CPUs on show are perfectly good options.

Check Also

OEMs enlist the help of AMD amid Intel shortage, boosting market share predictions

In light of Intel’s recent chip shortages, OEMs are turning to AMD in order to fulfil demand. This is expected to boost AMD’s market share by up to three times by next year.