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AOC U3277PQU 32-inch 4K display review

Rating: 8.5.

The AOC U3277PQU is a high-end 4K display, with a large 32-inch screen and a specification suited to graphic design work and gaming alike. It has a 10-bit IPS AHVA panel, built-in speakers, a picture-in-picture mode and a fully flexible stand – for a relatively reasonable price.

The different pricing tiers among 4K displays are quite clearly split between different panel technologies and screen size. For what might be considered an “entry-level” 4K screen, you pay around £350-450, and for that you get a TN (twisted nematic) display with screen size of around 27 inches, with a low refresh rate, usually 1ms grey-to-grey.

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An IPS panel for better viewing angles and overall picture quality adds to the cost considerably, as do screens larger than 27 inches. We’ve seen a number of 4K IPS displays with 32-inch screen sizes, such as the BenQ BL3201PT (Review HERE) and even 40 inches, in the case of the Philips Brilliance BDM4065UC (Review HERE).

At the very top end of the scale, you pay considerably more for features such as Nvidia G-Sync, as with the Asus ROG Swift PG27AQ (Review HERE) or if you want absolutely superb colour accuracy, you need to dig really deep into your pocket.

The 32-inch Asus ProArt PA329Q sports a lovely 100 per cent Adobe RGB coverage while Dell’s UltraSharp UP3216Q and EIZO’s beautiful ColorEdge CG318-4K displays offer good DCI-P3 coverage as well, but all three of these examples carry four-figure price tags.

AOC’s U3277PQU fits in between these ends of the pricing spectrum. It costs around £600, and is a 32-inch 4K display with an IPS panel and therefore, associated 178 degree viewing angles.

It sits alongside another similarly named AOC display, the £350 Q3277PQU, which carries a near-identical design but with a 2,560×1,440 native resolution. The ‘Q’ clearly stands for Quad HD, while the ‘U’ in the U3277PQU stands for Ultra HD.

AOC lists a 4ms response time, 350cd/m2 brightness, built-in speakers and audio passthrough, four display inputs and a stand with full tilt, pivot and rotate support.

Generally 4K monitors are still significantly more expensive than displays with a lower native resolution, but the AOC U3277PQU offers a lot of monitor for the money, and will work well for gaming, graphic design and general desktop use.

Specification:

Screen size: 32-inch
Native resolution: 3840×2160
Refresh rate: 60Hz
Panel type: IPS
Display inputs: HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2, VGA, DVI
USB hub: 4x USB 3.0
Tilt: Yes
Raise: Yes
Swivel: Yes
Other: 10-bit panel, 2x 3w speakers

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6 comments

  1. Just now l Received““my“`4th paycheck of $4395 working`onIy 3 h○urs` on my Iaptop` this week. My neighbor, who lives alone with toddlers, is making over $10k/monthIy doing this & convinced me to try. It’s so user friendly and easy to do so I thought to share it with you guys… T○ SEE what I D0“`have a peek on my“`Pr○FiIe ->>> I posted website link address there… Good luck

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  2. “The AOC U3277PQU is a high-end 4K display, with a large 32-inch screen and a specification suited to graphic design work and gaming alike. It has a 10-bit IPS AHVA panel, built-in speakers, a picture-in-picture mode and a fully flexible stand – for a relatively reasonable price.”

    How can anyone trust this review when the reviewer clearly doesn’t know what he is reviewing? The AOC U3277PQU is not a 4K monitor and it does not have an AHVA panel, it is a 2560×1440 monitor with an AMVA panel. I am looking at mine as I type.

    http://aoc-europe.com/en/products/q3277pqu

  3. You linked to the wrong product, take a closer look at the two names. You linked the Q3277 and not the U3277 reviewed here. The U in this case stands for UHD, while the Q on the product you linked to stands for QHD, explaining the difference in resolution. You should probably double-check what you are looking at if you are going to call someone out.

  4. Any measure of input lag for this display?
    Also, I thought this was an 8-bit panel with some special tech to simulate 10-bit colour range?

  5. Anatoli Miakotin (hardkotian)

    http://www.eltech.spb.ru/files/item/M320QAN01.0.pdf
    this is the display model which is used in this monitor. It’s clearly stated 10 bit RPG data input. (not 8 bit + FRC). The input lag is ~10 ms, which is very good result in a contrary to a new “gaming” ViewSonic XG2700-4K (23ms), look it here: http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/97846a8

  6. Anatoli Miakotin (hardkotian)

    You are wrong. Fulls specs you can find here http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/model/97846a8
    and official productsheet http://aoc-europe.com/en/products/pdf/u3277pqu?domain=aoc-europe.com