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ASUS ROG Maximus IX Apex (Z270) Motherboard Review

We will be outlining the ASUS ROG Maximus IX Apex motherboard’s performance with the Core i7 7700K CPU and 32GB of 3200MHz G.Skill Trident Z DDR4 memory.

By default the ASUS ROG Maximus IX Apex motherboard applies a multi-core turbo (MCT) state and forces the 7700K to a constant 4.5GHz when XMP is enabled. Overclocked performance will be outlined later in the review.

Z270 Motherboard Test System:

Comparison Z270 Motherboards:

Drivers and UEFI:

  • Intel Chipset 10.1.1.38
  • Nvidia GeForce 376.33 VGA drivers.
  • ASUS UEFI 0801 (24/02/2017)

Tests:

  • Cinebench R15 – All-core CPU benchmark (CPU)
  • HandBrake 1.0.0 – Convert 6.27GB 4K video recording using the Normal Profile setting and MP4 container (CPU)
  • SiSoft Sandra 2016 SP1 – Processor Arithmetic Test (CPU) and Memory Bandwidth Test (Memory)
  • 7-Zip 16.04 x64 – Built-in 7-Zip benchmark test (CPU)
  • AIDA64 Engineer 5.80.4000 – System stress test and cache & memory benchmark (Memory and Power)
  • 3DMark Fire Strike v1.1 – Fire Strike (1080p) test (Gaming)
  • Ashes of the Singularity – Built-in benchmark tool CPU-Focused test, 1920 x 1080, Extreme quality preset, DX12 version (Gaming)
  • Metro: Last Light Redux – Built-in benchmark tool, 1920 x 1080, Very High quality, SSAA, AF 16X, Tessellation: High (Gaming)
  • ATTO – M.2, USB 3.0, USB 3.1, and SATA 6Gbps transfer rates (Motherboard)
  • RightMark Audio Analyzer – Record and playback test using a line-in to line-out loopback with a 3.5mm audio cable (Motherboard)

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  • Matt Booth

    They really should keep the LN2 features away from consumer boards, because consumers are never, ever going to use LN2 on them at all. It’s just a ploy to crank the price up with an unnecessary feature most will never use.

    Same goes for the automatic overclocking stuff. No-one who spends £300 on a motherboard will be using that. At all. If a total newbie is going to get into PC stuff and has stupid money to burn, they’ll pay for OCUK or Scan to do it out of the box with warranty.

    The most striking feature of this board is the M.2 DIMM socket and weird shape (which puts me off slightly as it will reduce the stability of the board in terms of bending).

    And, as with all motherboards, there’s barely a difference worth bothering with in terms of performance. When I choose a board I choose one with enough sockets to do what I want and has the most appropriate features such as VRM cooling, USB sockets and fan headers.